"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
Ask your legislators to pass National Popular Vote

ZIP:
Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
Progress by State

Tom Golisano

Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

  • Videos

    Fox Interview

    CBS Video

    Popular Vote

    Class Election

    more videos

    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

    Add this poll to your web site
    News Journal (Delaware)
    Ditching the antiquated Electoral College
    Delaware should join reform effort
    News Journa Op-Ed
    By Joseph A. Pika
    June 15, 2010

    The election of 2000 may now be a vague memory to most Americans.

    As a refresher, George W. Bush won the presidency without winning the most votes, an honor that went to Al Gore. The winner was decided in the Electoral College where Bush received 1 more vote than the minimum required for victory, 270. Bush won because he received 537 more popular votes in Florida, but that slim margin gave him all of that state's 25 electoral votes.

    After a monthlong struggle between Democrats and Republicans over the Florida results (remember the hanging chads?) the Supreme Court's decision in Bush v. Gore determined the winner when Florida halted its voting recounts.

    History nearly repeated itself in 2004 when a shift of 60,000 votes in Ohio would have awarded John Kerry all of that state's electoral votes and given him the victory, even though George W. Bush had a popular vote margin of 3.5 million votes.

    Instead of totaling votes nationwide, with the highest vote-getter winning the contest for president, the United States filters the popular vote results through the Electoral College.

    Anyone who has tried to explain the American electoral system to non-U.S. citizens knows how hard it is to explain why Americans use a system that places so little confidence in the judgment of its citizens.

    The Electoral College system was designed in the 18th century, at a time when the education level of the populace was low and neither the transportation nor the communication systems of the nation allowed for campaigns that could inform voters. Those conditions have changed dramatically in the intervening centuries though the Electoral College lingers on.

    Each state receives the number of electoral votes equal to their total representation in Congress: Two senators plus the proportional share of seats in the House of Representatives. For Delaware, that's three.

    Under the Constitution, state legislatures determine how a state's electoral votes should be cast. Initially, the legislators, themselves, cast the votes. As democracy spread in the 1830s and later, legislatures allowed the popular vote to determine how electoral votes would be cast. To enhance their importance in the process, most states adopted a winner-take-all rule: The winner of a state's popular vote for president received all the electoral votes. Today, only two states follow a different rule. The winner of the most votes in each congressional district in Maine and Nebraska wins the associated electoral vote, and the state-wide popular vote winner gets the two votes associated with the Senate seats.

    Each state receives the number of electoral votes equal to their total representation in Congress: Two senators plus the proportional share of seats in the House of Representatives. For Delaware, that's three.

    Under the Constitution, state legislatures determine how a state's electoral votes should be cast. Initially, the legislators, themselves, cast the votes. As democracy spread in the 1830s and later, legislatures allowed the popular vote to determine how electoral votes would be cast. To enhance their importance in the process, most states adopted a winner-take-all rule: The winner of a state's popular vote for president received all the electoral votes. Today, only two states follow a different rule. The winner of the most votes in each congressional district in Maine and Nebraska wins the associated electoral vote, and the state-wide popular vote winner gets the two votes associated with the Senate seats.

    If conditions have changed and the system sometimes fails, why do we still have the Electoral College? Respect for the Constitution -- and reluctance to change it -- is one answer. The many proposals to change the election system have faced a major hurdle: It is extremely difficult to amend the Constitution. Officials in the fifteen or so battleground states that are the focus of presidential campaigns don't want to see their prominence reduced.

    The newest reform effort has now come to Delaware. It seeks to avoid the nearly impossible constitutional amendment process by establishing an agreement among the states. So far, Maryland, New Jersey, Illinois, Hawaii and Washington have adopted legislation that will award the state's electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote, regardless of popular vote results in the state -- once a sufficient number of states have enacted the procedure to ensure that someone wins 270 electoral votes. In 14 additional states, including Delaware, the proposal has won support from at least one legislative chamber. If successful, this effort would represent amendment-free constitutional reform, and this is consistent with the way that most other changes have been made in the presidential selection process throughout our history.

    Adopting rules that guarantee that the people's choice becomes president would bring the U.S. selection process into line with democratic practices throughout the world. This change would also reduce the problems faced by a winner whose victory is seen as out of step with the people's will.

    In June 2009, the Delaware House approved subscribing to the interstate compact by a vote of 23-12. The proposal is likely to be considered by the state Senate this week. Will Delaware seize this opportunity and vote for change?

    Joseph A. Pika is the James R. Soles Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Delaware.



    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President