"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Detroit News
    Elect the next U.S. president by counting popular vote
    Detroit News Op-Ed
    By Saul Anuzis
    April 8, 2010

    As former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party, I am asking you to consider a bipartisan, truly representative and a more fair process to elect the president of the United States. Our president.

    It is the National Popular Vote bill, which would guarantee the presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states, and I support it.

    The Michigan Senate is considering SB 598. The same bill passed the Michigan House earlier with strong bipartisan support.

    The National Popular Vote does not abolish the Electoral College. Instead, it uses the state's existing authority to change how the Electoral College is chosen, namely from the current state-by-state count to a popular vote.

    This would guarantee the presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states.

    The shortcomings of the current system stem from the winner-take-all rule (i.e., awarding all of a state's electoral votes to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in each state). Because of the winner-take-all rule, a candidate can win the presidency without winning the most popular votes nationwide.

    This has occurred in four of the nation's 56 presidential elections. As an example, a shift of fewer than 60,000 votes in Ohio in 2004 would have defeated President Bush despite his nationwide lead of 3.5 million votes.

    This is a state rights issue and we, the people, have the right to decide how and who is elected president.

    The U.S. Constitution gives the states exclusive and plenary control over the manner of awarding their electoral votes. The winner-take-all rule is not in the Constitution. It was not the founders' choice and was used by only three states in the nation's first presidential election in 1789. Maine and Nebraska award electoral votes by congressional district -- a reminder that an amendment to the Constitution is not required to change the way the president is elected.

    Under the National Popular Vote, all the electoral votes from the enacting states would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states. The bill would take effect only when enacted by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes -- that is, enough electoral votes to elect a president (270 of 538). As of today, the National Popular Vote Bill has been passed by 29 legislative chambers in 19 states. The most recent poll of Michigan voters found that 73 percent or our citizens support this concept. A 2007 national poll showed 72 percent supported it.

    The National Popular Vote bill has passed in states having almost a quarter of the electoral votes necessary to bring this into effect.This proposal would guarantee that every vote matters, that every state is relevant. Every community would have the same value to every candidate for president in every election.

    Michigan has been and will hopefully continue to be a battleground state. This bill would ensure Michigan and issues important to Michigan stay in the forefront.


    Saul Anuzis is former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party.



    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President