"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Tom Golisano

Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    FAQ

    What is the History by Which the Winner-Take-All Rule Became Nearly Universal in Presidential Elections?

    Under the "winner-take-all" rule, the presidential candidate receiving the most votes in each state is awarded 100% of the state's electoral votes. In the nation's first presidential election in 1789, only three states awarded their electoral votes using the "winner-take-all" rule. Many of the Founding Fathers considered the district system to be the most equitable (although it was used only by Virginia in the nation's first presidential election). In the nation's first competitive presidential election (1796), John Adams won by only three electoral votes. The Jeffersonians noted that their candidate had lost one electoral vote in his home state of Virginia and a second one in neighboring North Carolina. Just before the 1800 election, Thomas Jefferson wrote, "election by districts would be best, if it could be general; but while 10 states choose either by their legislatures or by a general ticket [winner-take-all], it is folly & worse than folly for the other" states to fragment their electoral votes by using a district system. Thus, Virginia changed from its district system to the winner-take-all rule, thereby ensuring Jefferson 100% of his home state's electoral votes in the 1800 elections. Over a period of years, more and more states gravitated to the statewide winner-take-all rule to avoid the "folly" of fragmenting their electoral votes. By 1836, all but one state had adopted the statewide winner-take-all rule. All states used the statewide winner-take-all rule between 1896 and 1972. Maine (since 1972) and Nebraska (since 1992) have used a congressional district system for allocating their electoral votes.


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President