"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
Ask your legislators to pass National Popular Vote

ZIP:
Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
Progress by State

Tom Golisano

Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

  • Videos

    Fox Interview

    CBS Video

    Popular Vote

    Class Election

    more videos

    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

    Add this poll to your web site

    27. Myth about the Replacement of a Dead, Disabled, or Discredited Presidential Candidate

    27.1  MYTH: Use of the winner-take-all rule permits replacement of a dead, disabled, or discredited President-Elect between Election Day and the meeting of the Electoral College, but the National Popular Vote compact does not.

    QUICK ANSWER:

  • The National Popular Vote compact would not abolish the Electoral College. Therefore, a dead, disabled, or discredited President-Elect could be replaced by the Electoral College in the same manner as is currently the case.
  • MORE DETAILED ANSWER:

    UCLA Law Professor Daniel H. Lowenstein points out that use of the winner-take-all rule permits replacement of a dead, disabled, or discredited President-Elect after the people vote in November, but before the Electoral College meets in December.

    Lowenstein says that this feature of the Electoral College is:

    “what might someday turn out to be the Electoral College’s greatest benefit.”

    Lowenstein continues:

    “What is needed for such problems is a political solution. And the Electoral College is ideal for the purpose. The decision would be made by people in each state selected for their loyalty to the presidential winner. Therefore, abuse of the system to pull off a coup d’etat would be pretty much out of the question. But in a situation in which the death, disability or manifest unsuitability plainly existed, the group would be amenable to a party decision, which seems to me the best solution.”

    The National Popular Vote compact would not abolish the Electoral College. It would reform the method of choosing the presidential electors so that they reflect the choice of all the people of the United States, instead of the choice of the people on a state-by-state basis using the winner-take-all rule.

    Therefore, the National Popular Vote compact does not eliminate the ability of the Electoral College to perform the function envisioned by Professor Lowenstein. Under the National Popular Vote compact, presidential electors associated with the political party that just won the national election would be available to replace a dead, disabled, or discredited President-Elect.


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President